iPro Slides - Artwork Layout and Orientation

CREATING PRODUCTION-READY ARTWORK FOR AN iPRO SLIDE

  1. Preparing your artwork
  2. Image Area and Sizing considerations
  3. Artwork Layout and Orientation
  4. Saving the File Type and Submitting the file

ARTWORK LAYOUT AND ORIENTATION
Orientation
Remember that your light fixture will project a circle. But often, your initial artwork will be in square or rectangular format. In this case, you have to choose between creating a slide design that is a circular "bite" out of the rectangle (an inscribed circle) or taking the full rectangular artwork and dropping it into a circular projection area (a conscribed circle).


TO CREATE AN INSCRIBED CIRCLE
First make sure that your graphics software is set to measure in actual pixels (not inches or mm since these measurements are dependant on resolution). Then draw a circular selection over the area you want to project, measuring out until it is 592 pixels. (It is okay if your selected circle is larger than 592 pixels. You can always reduce it to a smaller size later.) With your circle selected, choose Crop from the Edit menu to delete the unwanted portion of the image. You will be left with a square which is exactly the size of your circle. To make sure that we understand your intentions, fill in the corners of the square outside the circle in black. To do this, choose Select Inverse and then fill that region with black.

TO CREATE RECTANGULAR ARTWORK CONSCRIBED IN A CIRCLE
If you decide that your design should remain in a rectangular format, then you must make sure that your rectangle fits within a circular Image Area. The easiest way of doing this is to create a square that is 592 pixels square, and then draw a circle perfectly centered within that square, going right out to the edges. If your design fits with this circle, you are all set. You may need to resize your rectangle to make it fit.
Backgrounds
In the artwork you create, anything that is black will block the light, anything that is clear or a color will project. So if you intend to project an image that is not the full 592 pixel circle, make sure that you fill in the area around your design with black. For example:

Another common issue arises when you have a corporate logo that is typically shown on white paper. Should this design project with a black background or in a pool of white light?

ORIGINAL LOGO

BLACK BACKGROUND WHITE BACKGROUND
We do not recommend a full white background since the bright white light tends to wash out the details of the remaining design.

Some logos and designs are intended to print within a black box or circle. If the iPro Slide will should have a black background (as we recommend) how must the design change? Consider altering the design by including a white outline around the black box and then filling in the background. Or perhaps the interior of the design can stand on it's own within a complete black circle?

ORIGINAL LOGO DESIGN
CLEAR FIELD
(No change to design)
BLACK FIELD
(White box outline)
BLACK FIELD
(eliminate rectangle element)

Text and Fonts
If your design includes text then you will have to consider several other issues. Working in some of the more sophisticated graphics programs like Photoshop, text remains editable even after you type it. While this is a wonderful advancement for the designer, it can create problems when you submit your design to Rosco. If you submit a file that contains editable type, and Rosco does not own the font that was used in the design, "font substitution" may occur. This happens when the computer, looking for the original font and not finding it, selects another font with which to render the type. To avoid this problem, within Photoshop choose Layer Rasterize Type. This will convert the text to pixels and eliminate the need for the correct fonts to be loaded. If you are using another program that also maintains editable text, look in the instruction manual or help files to determine how to rasterize text.

The last aspect to consider when using text is the legibility of small size letters. Something that appears fine on screen may in fact project poorly. The easiest way of determining this is to increase the magnification on screen to about 800%. If the text still looks smooth and legible at that size, then your projection will be fine. If it appears too chunky and pixelated, consider enlarging the font size.

Next — Saving and Submitting Your Artwork ...